Bright kitchen

Don’t forget the kitchen sink

With modern living spaces tending towards a blend of eating, relaxation and socialising, the kitchen is increasingly the heart of the prestigious home. At the centre of this space is the highly utilised yet under-celebrated kitchen sink. If you are renovating your kitchen, then your choice of sink can make a huge impact. Sink style, position, materials, and function are critical design considerations when deciding.

 

Inset or undermount?

Basic 'undermount' sink design

There are three basic sink styles to know of inset (top mount), undermount, and integral.

Common in older kitchens, an top mount sink sits on a lip on the top of the counter and is not flush with the countertop.

An under-mount set-up is when the sink is fitted under the worktop, and a cut out made to match the sink size (see above image). The seamless countertop finish means no grooves, joins or lips to capture food particles and grime, which makes keeping your kitchen clean a breeze. 

An integral design is when the countertop and sink bowl is forged from literally the same material is one continuous piece e.g. commercial kitchens


Sink depth and design

 

If you have the space, it is always preferable to opt for a deep sink with at least two bowls and a centre half bowl. This is especially useful if you have a large family or host a lot.

 


Sink features and technology

 

As times have evolved, so has the sink. Modern options include instant filtered water – which can be fridge cold or boiling (to save the comparable hassle of using a kettle). In built food disposable units are a must too.

 

An elegant dual bowl sink in ceramic


What is the best material for a sink?


Ceramic

 

First seen in the 1700s, ceramic is highly durable, and the non-porous sealed surface is straightforward to keep clean and maintain. You will never dent a ceramic sink, but over time (with heavy wear), it is possible to crack or chip ceramic. Cream ceramic sinks certainly suit Hamptons style homes and other more traditional settings. They can also come in a range of colours which can be used to match your kitchen’s colour theme. Ceramic sinks have stood the test of time, as evidenced by stunning antique ceramic sinks still functioning today.


Steel
Steel sink
A steel 'integral' sink design

 

Steel countertops and sinks are ubiquitous in professional kitchens and can look fantastic in a modern prestige home. Steel sinks are also highly durable and stain-resistant and blend seamlessly with a steel countertop (if that is the kitchen’s style). Whilst steel can be dented (with difficulty), it will never crack or chip. Worried it may look a bit commercial or tinny? Elegant steel kitchen designs are made with thick low gauge steel, which is highly polished, instilling that feeling and look of quality that will last forever.

 

Composite Stone
Granite composite sink
Granite composite sink 'inset' design

Composite stone sinks are a blend of both manufactured and natural stone. For example, a composite granite sink consists of 80% granite or quartz. They are rock hard, durable, and will not scratch, dent or chip. Composite sinks are extremely heat resistant, whilst natural elements in the stone give the sink inbuilt antimicrobial properties.

Composite sinks can look very modern and sleek. Given that they are a blend of materials, they can come in various styles and colours to suit your modern kitchen.

 

Consider the sink’s style, materials, and your kitchen’s overall design when making a decision. In the grand scheme of home ownership it may seam a small thig, but when you get this right,  your kitchen will be a joy to use and behold. 

 

 

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